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US Department of Education: Oldies But Goodies: Learning from the Past and Present, Educating the Future
With nearly 90 years of cumulative experience providing legal advice on federal education programs, particularly Title I and the other programs in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 as amended (ESEA), two ED attorneys have a wealth of experience to help inform the present and future implementation of ESEA. On the 55th Anniversary of the original enactment of ESEA, join them to explore the lessons we can learn from the enactment and earlier years of ESEA that help inform the current and future administration of ESEA. Discuss how significant provisions such as supplement not supplant, maintenance of effort, equitable services for private school children, and allowable uses of funds support State and local federal program administrators in serving underserved populations and critical educational needs. Commemorate the ESEA’s passage with a tribute to lessons learned-and music on the side.
This talk was presented at:
2020 National ESEA Conference
March 2020 in Atlanta, GA
Speakers
Kay Rigling

Kay Rigling is the Deputy Assistant General Counsel for the Division of Elementary, Secondary, Adult and Vocational Education in the Office of the General Counsel at the U.S. Department of Education. She has provided legal advice on all facets of Title I since 1979. Prior to attending law school, Ms. Rigling taught children with disabilities.

Phil Rosenfelt

Philip Rosenfelt Deputy General Counsel for Program Service in the Office of the General Counsel U.S. Department of Education Philip H. Rosenfelt is the Deputy General Counsel for Program Service in the Office of the General Counsel at the U.S. Department of Education. In this post, he oversees legal services to the Department relating to the development and implementation of federal programs that assist elementary and secondary, vocational and adult education, special education, rehabilitative services, the Institute of Education Sciences, educational equity, and a number of other areas such as government contracts, personnel law, privacy issues, intellectual property, and the Freedom of Information Act. In an early part of his career, Mr. Rosenfelt was a rock music critic and an adjunct educator at the postsecondary education level.