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Integrating SEL School-wide: Lessons Learned from High-Performing, High-Poverty Schools

Developing students’ social and emotional learning (SEL) requires much more than a SEL program. Successful high-performing, high-poverty schools (HP/HP) integrate SEL into everything they do. Drawing from the 2nd Edition of the best-selling Turning High-Poverty Schools into High-Performing Schools and their new study of 16 HP/HP schools, the authors will share insight into how the practical strategies found in the Framework for Action seamlessly align with the ten indicators of school wide integration of SEL identified by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning. Participants will learn how educators in HPHP schools develop the collective efficacy required to fully integrate their efforts to improve academic, social and emotional learning in high-poverty environments. They will emerge from the session equipped with tools and a road map for disrupting poverty’s adverse influence, not only on academic learning, but on social and emotional learning as well.

This talk was presented at:
2020 National ESEA Conference
February 2020 in Atlanta, GA
For more information:
wparret@boisestate.edu kathleenbudge@boisestate.edu
Speakers
William Parrett

William and Kathleen have conducted multiple studies on High-Performing, High-Poverty schools over the past decade. Their research has taken them to urban, suburban, and rural schools and districts across the US and six other nations. These efforts have resulted in two best-selling books, media projects, multiple articles and frequent annual sharing of results, data and improvement recommendations to educators that seek to better serve their under-achieving students who live in poverty.

Kathleen Budge

William and Kathleen have conducted multiple studies on High-Performing, High-Poverty schools over the past decade. Their research has taken them to urban, suburban, and rural schools and districts across the US and six other nations. These efforts have resulted in two best-selling books, media projects, multiple articles and frequent annual sharing of results, data and improvement recommendations to educators that seek to better serve their under-achieving students who live in poverty.